Tensions Rise in Greece as Austerity Measures Backfire


Inquiring minds are reading about Greece once again. The summer has heat up in more ways than one. The Greek economy is in shambles

The austerity measures that were supposed to fix Greece’s problems are dragging down the country’s economy. Stores are closing, tax revenues are falling and unemployment has hit an unbelievable 70 percent in some places. Frustrated workers are threatening to strike back.

The feast of the Assumption of Mary on Aug. 15 is the high point of summer in the Greek Orthodox world. Here in one of the country’s many churches, believers pray to the Virgin for mercy, with many of them falling to their knees.

The newspaper Ta Nea has recommended that the Greek government adopt the very same approach — the country’s leaders have to hope that Mary comes up with a miracle to save Greece from a serious crisis, the paper writes. Without divine intervention, the newspaper suggested, it will be a difficult autumn for the Mediterranean state.

This dire prognosis comes even despite Athens’ massive efforts to sort out the country’s finances. The government’s draconian austerity measures have managed to reduce the country’s budget deficit by an almost unbelievable 39.7 percent, after previous governments had squandered tax money and falsified statistics for years. The measures have reduced government spending by a total of 10 percent, 4.5 percent more than the EU and International Monetary Fund (IMF) had required.

Think about that for a moment…Unemployment benefits are twice as good here in the US than in Greece. As you read the following bells and sirens should be going off in your head:

Meletis is a day laborer who used to work up to 300 days a year; this year he has only managed to scrape together 25 days’ work so far. That gives him 25 health insurance stamps, when he needs 100 in order to insure himself and his family — including his wife, who has cancer. “How am I supposed to pay for the hospital?” Meletis asks. Unemployment benefits of at most €460 ($590) per month are available for a maximum of one year — and only if he can produce at least 150 stamps from the past 15 months.

There’s hardly a worker in the shipbuilding district of Perama who could still manage that. Unemployment in the city hovers between 60 and 70 percent, according to a study conducted by the University of Piraeus. While 77 percent of Greek shipping companies indicate they are satisfied with the quality of work done in Perama, nearly 50 percent still send their ships to be repaired in Turkey, Korea or China. Costs are too high in Greece, they say. The country, they argue, has too much bureaucracy and too many strikes, with labor disputes often delaying delivery times.

Did you get that? “Costs are to high in Greece, they say.” That’s called “Deflation”

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