US Banks Report $1.4 Trillion Phantom Income


Inquiring minds are discovering that US Banks are reporting imaginary income from $1.4 Trillion in delinquent mortgages. In an eye-opening report, Robert Lenzner of Forbes writes that:

The giant US banks have been bailed out again from huge potential writeoffs by loosey-goosey accounting accepted by the accounting profession and the regulators.

They are allowed to accrue interest on non-performing mortgages ” until the actual foreclosure takes place, which on average takes about 16 months.

All the phantom interest that is not actually collected is booked as income until the actual act of foreclosure. As a resullt, many bank financial statements actually look much better than they actually are. At foreclosure all the phantom income comes off gthe books of the banks.

This means that Bank of America, Citigroup, JP Morgan and Wells Fargo, among hundreds of other smaller institutions, can report interest due them, but not paid, on an estimated $1.4 trillion of face value mortgages on the 7 million homes that are in the process of being foreclosed.

Ultimately, these banks face a potential loss of $1 trillion on nonperforming loans, suggests Madeleine Schnapp, director of macro-economic research at Trim-Tabs, an economic consulting firm 24.5% owned by Goldman Sachs.

You would expect that, after the 2007 banking crisis, no one would think of hiding any bad news. But these potential writeoffs could be even larger than what was mentioned in the quote above should home prices continue to weaken.

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One Response

  1. Where do they come up with this kind of accounting? I wonder which Universities teach this kind of arithmetic, or are banks just being ran by social promotion mathematicians.

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